Hellstorm Documentary

💻 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMCOKNCwHmQ

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Hitler’s War – What the Historians Neglect to Mention – Documentary


Hitler’s War: What the Historians Neglect to Mention. An English translation of “Hitlers Krieg? Was Guido Knopp Verschweigt” by Alphart Geyer (Germany 2009)

This is a 96 minute long “Made in Germany” underground documentary film. It’s the first documentary ever to unabashedly explain from the German perspective, how World War II really began, and the many efforts that were made by Hitler to avoid it, and to establish a lasting, viable and mutually acceptable peace, but how he was ultimately left with no choice but to invade Poland. It documents many facts that have been deliberately left out of the “official narrative” as presented by the victorious Allies, which we have all been taught since 1945, and which Germans especially have been constantly reminded of since the war ended; with the blame entirely upon Germany’s shoulders. Many of the claims of the Allies that have been widely accepted as fact are refuted here as patently untrue, distorted, or ignored completely. Continue reading

A Heuristic Exploration of “the Union.”

Posted as found @ Liberty and Learning

Heuristic: A form of education where the student is trained to find out things for himself.

William Rawle (1759-1836) studied law at Middle Temple, London in 1781, and returned to Philadelphia to open the Rawle Law Offices on September 15, 1783. He quickly took his place among Philadelphia’s legal elite, managing a successful law practice and participating in the formation of the new republic. Rawle’s reputation as a lawyer vaulted him into the position of delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Assembly of 1789. His public service continued when he accepted President Washington’s request to become the first U. S. Attorney for the District of Pennsylvania.

As U. S. Attorney, Rawle was instrumental in suppressing the Whiskey Rebellion in Western Pennsylvania and prosecuting the leaders of the insurrection. In 1792, Washington offered Rawle the position of federal judge for the new Pennsylvania district. When Rawle declined that post, Washington offered the position of U. S. Attorney General, which Rawle also declined, choosing instead to maintain his thriving private law practice. Rawle became the first chancellor of the newly-founded Philadelphia Bar Association in 1822, and remained in that position until his death. Rawle was a member of the American Philosophical Society, a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania, president of the local anti-slavery society, and founder and president of the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

Rawle authored A View of the Constitution of the United States of America, first edition 1825, second edition 1829 (and is still being reprinted in 2007). His book was adopted as a constitutional law textbook at West Point and other institutions and covers the subject in 344 pages. Continue reading

Patriots Day – April 19th in History

 

1770 – Captain James Cook discovered New South Wales, Australia. Cook originally named the land Point Hicks.
1775 – The American Revolution began as fighting broke out at Lexington, MA.
1802 – The Spanish reopened the New Orleans port to American merchants.
1839 – The Kingdom of Belgium was recognized by all the states of Europe when the Treaty of London was signed.
1861 – Thaddeus S. C. Lowe sailed 900 miles in nine hours in a hot air balloon.
1861 – The Baltimore riots resulted in four Union soldiers and nine civilians killed.

1861 – U.S. President Lincoln ordered a blockade of Confederate ports.
1892 – The Duryea gasoline buggy was introduced in the U.S. by Charles and Frank Duryea.
1897 – The first annual Boston Marathon was held. It was the first of its type in the U.S.

1933 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a proclamation that removed the U.S. from the gold standard.
1938 – General Francisco Franco declared victory in the Spanish Civil War.

1939 – Connecticut approved the Bill of Rights for the U.S. Constitution after 148 years.
1960 – Baseball uniforms began displaying player’s names on their backs.
1967 – Surveyor 3 landed on the moon and began sending photos back to the U.S.
1971 – Russia launched the Salyut into orbit around Earth. It was the first space station.
1975 – India launched its first satellite with aid from the USSR.
1982 – NASA named Sally Ride to be first woman astronaut.
1982 – The U.S. announced a ban on U.S. tourist and business travel to Cuba. The U.S. charged the Cuban government with subversion in Central America.
1987 – The last California condor known to be in the wild was captured and placed in a breeding program at the San Diego Wild Animal Park.
1989 – A giant asteroid passed within 500,000 miles of Earth.
1989 – In El Salvador, Attorney General Alvadora was killed by a car bomb.

1993 – The Branch-Davidian’s compound in Waco, TX, burned to the ground. It was the end of a 51-day standoff between the cult and U.S. federal agents.
1994 – A Los Angeles jury awarded $3.8 million to Rodney King for violation of his civil rights.

1995 – The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, OK, was destroyed by a bomb. It was the worst bombing on U.S. territory. 168 people were killed including 19 children, and 500 were injured. Timothy McVeigh was found guilty of the bombing on June 2, 1997.
2000 – The Oklahoma City National Memorial was dedicated on the fifth anniversary of the bombing in Oklahoma that killed 168 people.
2000 – In the Philippines, Air Philippines GAP 541 crashed while preparing to land. 131 people were killed.
2002 – The USS Cole was relaunched. In Yemen, 17 sailors were killed when the ship was attacked by terrorists on October 12, 2000. The attack was blamed on Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida network.